John Speed’s map of 1610

John Norden's map augmented by John Speed's map, 1610.  The first engraved maps of the counties of Great Britain were the work of Christopher Saxton who, under the authority of the Privy Council, surveyed the English counties in Elizabethan times, from 1574 to 1578. In 1593 he was followed by John Norden who projected an ambitious scheme for a complete series of county histories. He published before his death a number of counties - Middlesex, Hertfordshire, Essex, Northampton, Cornwall, Sussex and Surrey. John Speed's map of Sussex is based upon Norden's map and was engraved by Jodocus Hondius. It occupies pages nine and ten of John Speed's Atlas entitled "The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine", is 20 1/4 inches by 15 1/4 inches in size and shows additionally an interesting plan of Chichester and a spirited representation of the Battle of Hastings.

John Norden’s map augmented by John Speed’s map, 1610. The first engraved maps of the counties of Great Britain were the work of Christopher Saxton who, under the authority of the Privy Council, surveyed the English counties in Elizabethan times, from 1574 to 1578. In 1593 he was followed by John Norden who projected an ambitious scheme for a complete series of county histories. He published before his death a number of counties – Middlesex, Hertfordshire, Essex, Northampton, Cornwall, Sussex and Surrey. John Speed’s map of Sussex is based upon Norden’s map and was engraved by Jodocus Hondius. It occupies pages nine and ten of John Speed’s Atlas entitled “The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine”, is 20 1/4 inches by 15 1/4 inches in size and shows additionally an interesting plan of Chichester and a spirited representation of the Battle of Hastings.